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Arpita Basu

Arpita Basu pursued her M.V.A from Rabindra Bharti University, Kolkata (1992). Deeply connected with her hometown and Bengali culture, Arpita uses her canvas as a medium to shower her love and dedication towards the beautiful cities and villages and their traditions. Truly dedicated to her art, Arpita Basu makes her own canvas by layering multiple hand-made rice papers on top of each other, to create a fine and unique texture for her canvas. She gravitated towards this medium, after painting on silk for many years. She uses watercolours to paint her dreamy cityscapes and captures the everyday lives of Bengali people. Her colours are a light and airy combination of cool hues and earth tones of warm colours. Though Arpita’s…

Arpita Basu pursued her M.V.A from Rabindra Bharti University, Kolkata (1992). Deeply connected with her hometown and Bengali culture, Arpita uses her canvas as a medium to shower her love and dedication towards the beautiful cities and villages and their traditions.

Truly dedicated to her art, Arpita Basu makes her own canvas by layering multiple hand-made rice papers on top of each other, to create a fine and unique texture for her canvas. She gravitated towards this medium, after painting on silk for many years. She uses watercolours to paint her dreamy cityscapes and captures the everyday lives of Bengali people. Her colours are a light and airy combination of cool hues and earth tones of warm colours.

Though Arpita’s paintings largely fall into the catagory of cityscapes, through these works, she writes an ode to her homeland, its traditions and the social lives of her people. She captures the blissful lives of people in West Bengal. One can observe a variety of people, running errands, completing their daily chores, and working their daily jobs. Mothers and wives cooking and serving food to their families, decorating houses, men working at farms, buying groceries at the haats, washing and ironing clothes, and children, playing in the rains, and making paper boats. A single glance at these paintings would transport you to the hushed afternoons in the quiet Bengali towns.

Arpita’s work is inspired by the folk art of Kantha. Traditionally Bengali women would gather together at the end of the day and make simple quilts using old cotton sarees. Women would layer old cotton sarees and embroider them together using Kantha stitch to make blankets and bedspreads for children. Since each woman worked on different parts of the same quilt, each part carried its own unique character and design. Arpita recreates the beauty of this vintage tradition through her paintings. Her layered rice papers canvas and rustic colour palette gives these classic quilts a modern twist and her paintings look like contemporary tapestries.

Over the years, Arpita Basu has showcased her works at many prestigious Indian and international art galleries and participated in group and solo exhibitions. She also received The Pollock - Krasner Foundation Inc. Grant in 1998-99, and National Scholarship by the Government of India (1990-92). Arpita’s paintings are held in many private collections in India and abroad, including at the Governor House, Kolkata and the prestigious Victoria Albert Museum, Lo

 

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